Your place to discover great books. (I might be biased.)

About Me

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Jeremy Bursey writes novels, short stories, blog posts, notes-to-self, and other “literary” forms of content for his entertainment, and hopefully yours, focusing on thrillers, coming-of-age stories, action-adventure, and whatever makes him laugh. He also makes computer games on occasion, whenever his math brain is working properly. Sometimes it works. This is his official author site.

Once upon a time, I was a kid, and I was a kid who played with toys. Although my favorite plastic and diecast metal avatars were the Transformers, in spite of them being so physically disproportionate to one another that simulating anything I saw on TV was next to absurdity, I was happy to toss any random action figure I had, from hand-me-downs to Christmas presents, into the big “battle royale wrestling pile beside the cliff that overlooked a field of lava” to see who would come out on top and who would end up in the hole. The melee usually came down to my severed G.I. Joe figures, mended only by a splint made of clay (they were held together by rubber bands that snapped easily), a souped-up C3PO (again, clay) who looked more like an enforcer from the Borg than the pacifist droid we know and kind of love, and “Tork, the Turning Terror,” a lava creature with a bird beak and nasty trident that I quite honestly knew nothing about but thought he was the villain to beat among my pile of fallen heroes.

Tork, the Turning Terror

Turns out he’s part of the Power Lords universe, which I was never too up-to-date with, even in the early to mid-1980s. The button will open a fan page from 2011 in a new tab if you want to see what he looks like.

In those days of my early youth, I didn’t know much about the differences between good and evil, but I understood that good usually triumphed over evil, so you could be sure my heroes would conquer my villains, even on the precipice of the Cliffside of Doom (aka, my parents’ dresser, which sat on an orange carpet—again, early 1980s). It didn’t matter that Iceberg in his arctic gear, his two halves mended together by a clay wrapping, was small compared to the lava bird creature or the one-armed Mumm-ra (toys broke really easily in those days, it seemed), he would almost always win. Because he’s the good guy.

(I’d just post pics of my own toys if it didn’t require me to bring in a dirty ladder to access a rat-infested attic. But since I don’t want to do that, I’ll share links to other people’s blogs, so you can find out more about these toys and characters if you’re already bored of my bio and really want to see what you’ve missed out on by not being a kid in the 1980s, or relive your childhood in the event you share my good fortune. Come on, I know you cried, too, when Optimus Prime died.)

Well, at some point I got older, and even though I still liked the Transformers, and I was beginning to discover the Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles, thanks to the hard-as-nails Nintendo game they starred in when their popularity began to rise, I was just getting too old to play with them, according to the healthy social standards of the day (sorry, C.S. Lewis), so I had to refocus my creative story-telling energies somewhere else, like in videogames. Because they were toys for older kids!

Iceberg

From G.I. Joe. See what he looks like in one piece. The button will open a Fandom page in a new tab if you want to know more.

Mumm-Ra

From Thundercats. See Mumm-ra with all his parts in place. The button will open a Comic Vine page in a new tab if you want to see his ugly face.

(I’d just post pics of my own toys if it didn’t require me to bring in a dirty ladder to access a rat-infested attic. But since I don’t want to do that, I’ll share links to other people’s blogs, so you can find out more about these toys and characters if you’re already bored of my bio and really want to see what you’ve missed out on by not being a kid in the 1980s, or relive your childhood in the event you share my good fortune. Come on, I know you cried, too, when Optimus Prime died.)

Now, I had the NES (Nintendo Entertainment System), and I certainly projected many of my new, adventurous ideas onto the game characters (because 8-bit gaming was notorious for having flimsy storylines in the late ‘80s and ‘90s, and I could remake the characters into whatever I wanted without it being weird). But there was still a limit on how I could tell the story. I couldn’t, for example, pretend to have Mega Man shoot through a wall to rescue the damsel-in-distress when he couldn’t destroy most walls, and when the “damsel” was actually an old, bearded scientist. I could make up any story I wanted, as long as it fit the graphical retelling I had on my television.

It was, therefore, inevitable that I’d take up writing to fill the void. But when I turned 13, I was still no fan of reading, so the idea of writing to tell my stories was a tough sell. Fortunately, it wasn’t an impossible one. In fact, I had just created a “choose your own adventure” style adventure game where the player named a city and destination within that city, and listed five numbers between 1 and 144 in random order, and then I’d tell the story of that player’s journey to his destination by reading off the mini-narratives within each numbered box. It often didn’t end well. But it was fun. And it required some writing, enough to scratch the itch. So, I was warming up to the idea of putting words on paper for fun, even if I didn’t particularly enjoy reading words out of a book.

My turning point, however, came two months after my 13th birthday when I had on a rerun of The Jeffersons, and Florence (the maid) was typing a mystery (on an actual clickety-clack typewriter), and the entire episode recast the main characters as characters in her novel. I thought, “I should do that.”

So I did.

But not with characters from The Jeffersons, FYI.

And I kept doing it, beginning with an awful novelization of that very game where players choose their paths through the city and, hopefully, reach their destinations in one piece.

Through high school.

Through college.

And into adulthood and the present time.

This website is a testament to my journey so far. It’s also a testament to the many distractions and setbacks that have gotten in the way, as the years that followed weren’t always the most productive. But the important thing is that those obstacles hadn’t kept me down for good. As my library grows, so will the author story I still have to share with you.

Powerstick Man Comic in a Transformers Folder

Through high school.

Through college.

And into adulthood and the present time.

Powerstick Man Comic in a Transformers Folder

This website is a testament to my journey so far. It’s also a testament to the many distractions and setbacks that have gotten in the way, as the years that followed weren’t always the most productive. But the important thing is that those obstacles hadn’t kept me down for good. As my library grows, so will the author story I still have to share with you.

Yeah, I know, that’s obvious, but still kind of poetic, so take it with a smile!

If you’d like to follow along my path, please check out each page on this site, especially “My Books” and “Other Media,” as these are the results of my long-suffering and possibly unwise life choices, but also take a look at my blog (under “Latest News”) to see what’s got my attention today.

And don’t forget to join my newsletter, as that will keep you up-to-date on the status of new and upcoming releases, as well as alert you to special sales and promotions on those releases. These reports will be sent to your inbox (and possibly to your junk mail if your filters are being extra aggressive, so be sure to check there, too, just in case), and you’ll be able to read them or delete them at your leisure, as well as continue to receive them or unsubscribe if you decide you’d rather read romance. It’s really quite flexible.

So, please stick around and join me as this journey continues. And if it helps, I typically write thrillers, coming-of-age tales, and action-adventures, as referenced in this website’s header. Yeah, I know, that’s also obvious. But now you’ll remember!

Thanks for checking this place out, and I hope you’ll join my tribe of dedicated and happy readers. And if for any reason you decide this is not your ideal place, then I still want to thank you for reading this far. If it were me, I’d have checked out back at the pictureless toy button links. So, thanks for going the extra mile!

Yes, I wrote a cliché.

 

–Jeremy Bursey

 

P.S. You can learn even more if you check out my other blog site, Drinking Café Latte at 1pm. Even though I post writer- and novel-related content here on my author site, I post whatever else I think about on the other site, so it’s a good idea to subscribe to both channels.

BW photo from 2010

There’s gotta be a way to get those rats out of the attic.